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LASIK Surgery

LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis), is the most popular refractive surgical procedure. In this procedure, a laser is used to permanently change the shape of the cornea (the clear covering on the front of the eye) to correct common vision problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia. This improves vision and reduces a person's need for glasses or contact lenses.

LASIK uses an excimer laser (an ultraviolet laser) to remove a thin layer of corneal tissue, giving the cornea a new shape, so that light rays are focused clearly on the retina. In the case of a nearsighted person, the goal of LASIK is to flatten the too-steep cornea; with farsighted people, a steeper cornea is desired. LASIK can also correct astigmatism by smoothing an irregular cornea into a more normal shape.

LASIK is an outpatient surgical procedure with no need to stay at the surgery center overnight as it will take 10 to 15 minutes to perform for each eye. The procedure is done while the patient is awake, but the patient may request mild sedation. The only anesthetic used is eye drops that numb the surface of the eye. LASIK can be done on one or both eyes during the same session.


How to Prepare for LASIK Eye Surgery?

Before LASIK eye surgery, the eye surgeon will evaluate the patient’s medical history and perform a full eye examination, including measuring corneal thickness, refraction, corneal mapping, eye pressure, and pupil dilation. Afterward, the surgeon will discuss what to expect during and after the procedure.

On the day of the surgery, eat a light meal before going to the doctor and take all prescribed medications, if any. Do not wear eye makeup, creams, perfumes or lotions on the day before and the day of surgery, or have any bulky hair accessories that will interfere with positioning head under the laser.

Contact lenses shouldn't be worn for at least three days prior to the evaluation. In the case of, rigid gas permeable contact lenses, they should not be worn for at least three weeks before. Patients should arrange for a ride home from the place of surgery, as their vision might be blurry.
 

Refraction Test

A refraction test, also called a vision test, is usually performed as a part of a routine eye examination. The purpose of this test is to determine if a person has a refractive error which would then mean the patient would need glasses or contact lenses.
 

What Is The Normal Value for Refraction Test?

A value of 20/20 is normal (optimum) vision. This means that individuals who have 20/20 vision are able to read letters that are 3/8-inch (1 centimeter) tall from 20 feet (6 meters) away. The normal uncorrected vision (without glasses or contact lenses) refractive error is zero (plano). Individuals who don’t have 20/20 vision, have what is called a refractive error. A refractive error means that the light is not bending properly when it passes through the lens of the eye. The refraction test will tell the doctor what prescription lens should be used in order to have 20/20 vision.

For people over age 40 who have normal distance vision but difficulty with near vision, a refraction test with a small type size is used to determine normal near vision and the correct power of reading glasses.
 

How Is The Refraction Test Performed?

The test is performed by having the patient seated in a chair that has a special device (called a phoropter or refractor) attached to it. The patient looks through the device and focuses on an eye chart 20 feet (6 meters) away. The device contains lenses of different strengths that can be moved into the patient’s view. The test is performed one eye at a time. If the patient is wearing contact lenses, they should be removed before the test.

In case the final vision is less than 20/20 even with lenses, then there is probably another non-optical problem with the eye. The vision level achieved during the refraction test is called the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA).
 

What Are The Causes of Abnormal Refraction Test Results?

  • Abnormal results may be due to:

  • Astigmatism (abnormally curved cornea causing blurred vision)

  • Hyperopia (farsightedness)

  • Myopia (nearsightedness)

  • Presbyopia (inability to focus on near objects that develop with age)
     

Other conditions under which the test may be performed:

  • Corneal ulcers and infections

  • Loss of sharp vision due to macular degeneration

  • Retinal detachment (separation of the light-sensitive membrane (retina) in the back of the eye from its supporting layers)

  • Retinal vessel occlusion (blockage in a small artery that carries blood to the retina)

  • Retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited disorder of the retina)
     

There is an art to refraction and the optometrist will always answer the patient’s questions and as well as discuss their findings. Based on the results of the refraction test, they can determine the amount of myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism.
 

Amblyopia

Amblyopia, also known as a “lazy eye”, is described as a reduced vision in one eye compared to the other. There are some rare forms of amblyopia that involve both eyes. Amblyopia is the most common cause of partial or total blindness in one eye in children.

The term lazy eye is misleading because the eye is not actually lazy. In fact, it is a developmental problem in the nerve connecting the eye to the brain, affecting the brain’s ability to use both eyes together. It is not a problem in the eye itself, but in the brain which actively ignores the visual input from the misaligned eye, leading to amblyopia in that eye.

In addition to poor visual acuity, people with amblyopia are more prone to having difficulties with depth perception, eye movements related to reading, and visual decision making while driving.
 

What Are The Causes of Amblyopia?

Amblyopia develops in childhood due to:

  • Significant differences in the prescription (refractive) status between the two eyes due to nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism;

  • Constantly misaligned eyes or crossed eyes (strabismus);

  • An obstruction of vision in early childhood i.e. cataract, ptosis (droopy eyelid)
     

It is important to note that, because amblyopia is typically a problem of infant vision development, symptoms of the condition can be difficult to detect. Symptoms may include noticeably favoring one eye over the other, an eye turn (either upward-downward outward or inward) or a tendency to bump into objects on one side.

The best way to identify children who are at risk for or already have amblyopia is by performing comprehensive eye examinations.
 

How Is Amblyopia Treated?

Amblyopia can be treatable at any age, although the earlier the problem is found and treated, the more successful the outcomes tend to be.

Types of Daily Contact Lenses

Wearing contact lenses gives patients the flexibility and freedom to live life to the fullest, without some of the difficulties presented by wearing glasses. Many people who choose contact lenses do so because they don’t like the way that glasses look or feel, or because wearing glasses compromises their ability to perform certain tasks or activities, such as sports or jobs that require the use of safety goggles. 

There are lots of different contact lenses to choose from, with two of the most popular being daily disposables and toric lenses. 
 

Disposable Lenses

As their name suggests, these daily contact lenses are disposable. This means that they can and should be discarded at the end of each day rather than re-worn. Disposable lenses do tend to be a little more expensive than some repeat-wear varieties, but the benefits usually outweigh the cost. 

Some of the advantages of choosing daily disposable contact lenses include:

  • You don’t have to clean them, which saves patients a great deal of time and hassle. It also helps save money in terms of the ongoing cost of cleaning solution. 

  • Disposable lenses are also great for people with eye allergies. This is because with ordinary lenses, there’s an opportunity for deposits and microorganisms to build up. With daily disposables, allergens have less chance to attach themselves to the lenses and cause irritation and other allergy symptoms. 

  • You don’t need to schedule regular replacements either, which makes wearing contact lenses easier on your schedule. 

  • Disposable contact lenses are particularly good for people who have busy lives and are likely to cut corners when it comes to caring for their eyes or contacts since there is no cleaning or maintenance required.


Daily disposable contact lenses are available in a wide range of prescriptions, including those for patients with nearsightedness and farsightedness. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a candidate for disposable contact lenses. 
 

Toric Lenses

Toric contact lenses are recommended for patients who have a refractive eye problem called astigmatism. Patients with astigmatism have corneal abnormalities that cause the refraction of the eye to be different between the vertical and horizontal planes, causing blurred vision and difficulty seeing fine details. Toric contact lenses are shaped in a particular way that creates the different focusing powers needed in each part of the lens to correct your vision. For this reason, it’s essential that Toric lenses are placed into the eyes in the correct position.

Fortunately, manufacturers design Toric lenses with features that help them to stay in place, including:

  • Thin/thick zones

  • Creating areas of the lens that are thicker or heavier which helps secure it in position 

  • An area where the bottom of the lens is slightly cut off 


To keep them stable, Toric lenses are a little firmer than conventional soft lenses. This means that some patients can find them a little less comfortable, but the superior vision they obtain outweighs this. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a good candidate for Toric contact lenses and which variety would best suit you. 

To find out more about daily contact lenses, speak to our friendly and knowledgeable team. 

Keratoconus and Your Treatment Options

Keratoconus is a terrifying diagnosis to those that have experienced it. To compound issues, many patients complain that they had poor initial treatment due to a lack of understanding about the disease. If proper treatment is not achieved, individuals may experience a rapid deterioration in their ability to see. This leads to a reduced quality of life. You can reduce the stress related to a keratoconus diagnosis and increase the benefits of treatment by understanding your treatment options.
 

Understanding Keratoconus

Keratoconus is an eye disease that causes the cornea to thin and bulge. This bulge generally takes on the appearance of a cone. As light enters the eye, it becomes distorted by the cone causing vision abnormalities.

Modern research is connecting keratoconus with an enzyme imbalance in the cornea. This imbalance leaves the eye susceptible to oxidative free radicals. Keratoconus has also been linked to UV damage, excessive eye rubbing, poorly fitting contacts, and chronic eye irritation.
 

Treatment Options

While your eye professional will have the best understanding of what treatment option is right for you, we have compiled ten of the most common treatments here.

  • Corneal Cross-linking (CXL) – There are two different types of this procedure, but they both introduce riboflavin to the cornea in order to strengthen the corneal tissue and stop the bulging from progressing.

  • Custom Soft Contact Lenses – Soft contacts are generally more comfortable to wear than gas permeable lenses. Recently, some contact companies have been able to create a contact specifically to correct the issues related to mild and moderate cases of keratoconus.

  • Gas Permeable Contact Lenses – Gas permeable lenses are a hard contact lens that physically forces the eye to adhere to the lens shape. This allows for the correction of keratoconus. The fit is often time-consuming and may take several different lenses to achieve the proper fit.

  • Piggybacking Contact Lenses – This method is used for individuals who require a gas permeable lens but cannot tolerate wearing rigid contacts. Piggybacking utilizes a soft lens placed on the eye first, and then a gas permeable lens is placed over the top. This offers the comfort of soft contacts with the rigidity and clarity of the gas permeable lenses.

  • Hybrid Contact Lenses – Hybrid contact lenses were designed specifically for keratoconus. This technology blends a rigid contact lens center with a softer edge, or skirt, of the contact

  • Scleral and Semi-Scleral lenses – These lenses are gas permeable lenses but cover a larger area of the eye than a standard rigid lens. These lenses don’t put pressure onto the cone shape of the eye. The reduced pressure results in a more comfortable fit for patients.

  • Prosthetic Lenses – This lens is used specifically for patients that have very advanced keratoconus and have ruled out other options. The advanced scleral lens also doubles as a protective prosthetic shell. There are special requirements to qualify for this lens though, so check with your eye care professional if this is an option for you.

Optikam

Eye care professionals use Optikam’s technology to capture more than 3 million eyewear measurements every year. The OptikamPad iPad app is a total dispensing solution that enables eye care professionals to successfully assist patients at all stages of the eyewear dispensing process, providing them with a unique and custom patient experience.

 

Optikam Posture Devise (OPD)

You may be surprised to learn that wearing glasses can and likely will affect your posture. Glasses lenses are most accurate when you look directly through their center. This means if your glasses are sitting too low or have slipped down your nose, you may find that you are subconsciously tilting your head back and this can affect your overall posture.

 

Optikam’s OPD measurement device is a cutting-edge tool that obtains eyewear measurements that take into account how the frame will be worn by patients, enabling the fit to be customized to their individual parameters. The ten measurements taken into account when determining each patient’s position of wear include:

  • Monocular pupillary distance

  • Multifocal seg heights

  • Pantoscopic tilt

  • Rear vertex distance

  • Wrap (face form tilt)

  • Near pupillary distance

 

This results in frames that not only look fantastic, but that also fit perfectly, remaining both comfortable and stable on the face without you needing to adopt an unnatural posture. The measurements obtained by the Optikam OPD measurement tool are immediately visible on your eye doctor’s tablet so that they can recommend which alterations to the frames are needed to ensure that the frames fit with precision and gives you the best visual experience.

 

Benefits of OptikamPad and Optikam OPD

Traditionally, the process of a comprehensive eye exam, choosing frames and fitting glasses requires fairly close contact with your eye doctor or other eye care professionals. However, with social distancing being a new process variable, many patients are looking for more virtual options. Fortunately, OptikamPad makes it possible for optical stores to dispense eyeglasses with minimal human contact. This is because the OptikamPad can take measurements from a further distance or even through plexiglass screens. It can even be placed on a stand and the app operated using a Bluetooth mouse, putting even greater distance between your eye care professional and you. 

If you would like to find out more about Optikam OPD and OptikamPad, our knowledgeable team would be delighted to help. Please contact us with any questions or to schedule an appointment.

iLux

If you have dry eye syndrome, you understand the frustration of repeatedly applying eye drops and other therapies in vain. The iLux®, a new product on the market, may help address your problem. 


It treats dry eye syndrome by combining heat and pressure to clear obstructions from the meibomian glands. Learning how it works and its advantages in treating dry eyes may help you.

 

What Is iLux?

 

Millions of individuals worldwide suffer from the prevalent ailment known as dry eye syndrome. This happens when your eyes do not produce tears in sufficient amounts or when tears evaporate too soon. Discomfort, irritability, and even eyesight issues may result from this. Although several treatments for dry eyes exist, many are transient and call for repeated application.


iLux is a medical device designed to treat dry eye syndrome. It combines heat and pressure to remove blockages from the meibomian glands. These glands in the eyelids produce the oil that prevents your tears from evaporating too quickly. 


The handheld device is easy to use, making it a convenient and effective solution for those who suffer from dry eyes. It is a practical choice for people with busy schedules because no downtime or recovery period is necessary.

 

How Does It Work?

 

The device works by applying gentle heat and pressure to the eyelids. This helps loosen and remove blockages from the meibomian glands. The treatment allows the glands to function properly, producing the necessary oils to keep the eyes moisturized and healthy. The device also provides targeted treatment to specific areas of the eyelids. This allows for a more customized and effective treatment experience.

 

Benefits 

 

Using this medical device to treat dry eyes offers numerous benefits, including:
 

  • Improved Comfort


Dry eyes can cause discomfort, irritation, and even pain. By treating dry eyes with iLux, you can experience improved comfort and reduced symptoms.
 

  • Enhanced Vision


Dry eye syndrome can affect vision, causing blurriness or difficulty focusing. Treating the condition with iLux can help improve vision and clarity.
 

  • Noninvasive


Unlike other treatments for dry eyes, such as surgery, iLux is a noninvasive solution that requires no downtime or recovery period.

 

How to Use the Device

 

Using iLux to treat dry eyes is straightforward. Since it is handheld and portable, this device is easy to use at home and when traveling.


To use it, follow these steps:
 

  • To determine if it is a good fit for you and to get usage instructions, consult your eye doctor.

  • Position the device against your closed eyelid over the affected area.

  • It will apply gentle heat and pressure to the eyelid, helping remove blockages from the meibomian glands.

  • Repeat this process on each eyelid as instructed by your doctor.


After using it, you may experience some mild discomfort or redness in the treated area. These are usually not severe; they should go away within a day or two.

 

Conclusion

 

If you are experiencing dry eyes, the iLux might be the solution for you. This noninvasive medical device uses heat and pressure to remove blockages from the meibomian glands. The treatment allows for improved eye health and comfort. To learn more about the device and whether it is right, consult your eye doctor today.

MiBo Thermoflo

Dry eye is a common condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the eyes do not produce enough tears or when the tears evaporate too quickly. This can lead to discomfort, irritation, and even vision problems. If you are suffering from the discomfort of dry eye, MiBo Thermoflo can offer you a revolutionary solution.
 

Understanding the Causes of Dry Eye

 

Dry eye is a condition that occurs when the eyes do not produce enough tears or when the tears evaporate too quickly. There are several factors that can contribute to this condition, including environmental factors, certain medications, and aging. Environmental factors such as dry or windy climates, air conditioning, and excessive screen time can all worsen dry eye symptoms. Additionally, certain medications like antihistamines, decongestants, and diuretics can decrease tear production. Aging is also a common cause of dry eye, as tear production naturally decreases as we get older.
 

Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and blepharitis are two common conditions that can contribute to the development of dry eye. MGD occurs when the meibomian glands, which are responsible for producing the oily layer of tears, become blocked or dysfunctional. This can lead to an inadequate amount of oil in the tears, causing them to evaporate too quickly. Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that can disrupt the normal functioning of the meibomian glands.

Atropine Drops

Myopia is a common vision problem affecting a large number of individuals worldwide. It occurs when the eye is unable to focus properly on distant objects, resulting in blurred vision. Myopia can develop during childhood and progress into adulthood if left unmanaged.
 

What Causes Myopia to Develop?

 

Myopia can be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. If one or both parents have myopia, there is a higher chance that their children will develop the condition. Additionally, excessive screen time, lack of outdoor activities, and prolonged near-work activities such as reading or using electronic devices can contribute to the development of myopia. These lifestyle factors can lead to the elongation of the eyeball, resulting in the inability to focus on distant objects.
 

The Importance of Myopia Management

 

Managing myopia is crucial to prevent its progression and associated complications. High levels of myopia can increase the risk of developing eye conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, and retinal detachment.
 

Additionally, severe myopia can lead to vision loss and significantly impact the quality of life. Early intervention and proper management of myopia can help slow down its progression and reduce the risk of these complications.

Senior Care

Senior eye care is crucial for maintaining optimal vision and overall eye health as we age. As individuals grow older, they become more susceptible to age-related eye conditions. Regular comprehensive eye exams play a key role in early detection and management of these conditions, helping to preserve vision and prevent potential vision loss. By staying proactive with eye care and seeking timely professional assistance, seniors can enjoy clear, comfortable vision and ongoing eye health for years to come.
 

Common Eye Conditions in Seniors

 

As we reach our golden years, there are several eye conditions that become more prevalent. These conditions can have a significant impact on our vision and overall quality of life.
 

  • Presbyopia: This condition affects near vision, making it difficult to focus on close objects. It is a normal part of aging and is typically addressed with reading glasses or multifocal lenses.

  • Floaters and Flashes: As the vitreous inside the eye changes with age, it can lead to the perception of floaters (small dark spots or lines) and flashes of light. While often harmless, sudden onset of floaters and flashes may indicate a retinal tear or detachment and should be promptly evaluated.

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD): AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in older adults. It affects the macula, the central part of the retina, leading to blurred or distorted central vision. There are two forms of AMD, dry AMD, and wet AMD, with the latter being more severe.

  • Cataracts: Cataracts are a common age-related condition characterized by the clouding of the eye's natural lens. This can lead to blurry vision, glare, and difficulty seeing in low-light conditions.

  • Glaucoma: Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, often due to elevated intraocular pressure. It can result in peripheral vision loss and, if left untreated, may lead to total blindness.

  • Diabetic Retinopathy: For seniors with diabetes, diabetic retinopathy is a concern. It occurs when high blood sugar levels damage the blood vessels in the retina, leading to vision problems and potential blindness if not managed.

  • Dry Eye Syndrome: Seniors may experience dry eye syndrome, characterized by insufficient lubrication and moisture on the surface of the eye. It can cause discomfort, redness, and fluctuating vision.

     

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